How do I actually get pregnant as a surrogate?

Posted

You have met the perfect intended parents, you have a “beautiful uterus”, but how do you actually get pregnant and become a surrogate? This will differ slightly with each case because everyone is different in how their body reacts to the medications and how each clinic operates. Each surrogate will work with her coordinator and the fertility clinic to start preparing the body to accept the embryo. Each clinic and their protocol differ; you may have a HSC (Hysteroscopy) where the doctor will check your uterus, or a HSG (Hysterosalpingogram) where the doctor will check your fallopian tubes. You will begin fertility medication, and again, these medications will vary from surrogate to surrogate. You will start birth control to start to control your cycle and work with the medication to track the best day for transfer. Some of the medications are Estradiol, Progesterone, Progesterone in oil. You will work with your clinic coordinator on a medication calendar and you will schedule monitoring visits to see how your body is reacting to the medication.

Once your uterus is nice and fluffy your Transfer Day will be scheduled. This is the day that the embryo/embryos will be implanted. You will arrive on Transfer Day with a full bladder and the embryologist will perform the very quick and painless procedure- transferring the embryo or embryos. You will be able to watch this amazing technology on the ultrasound screen. At the transfer, the Intended Parents will know the quality, quantity, and gender of their embryos.After the procedure you will follow the clinic’s post-op directions. Most clinics require a day of rest. The next step is the dreaded two-week wait where you are anxiously awaiting the BETA test (which is a blood test that measures HCG- the hormone to determine if the transfer was a success & if you are pregnant).

You will continue monitoring with the clinic and have an ultrasound scheduled to detect a heartbeat and confirm a viable pregnancy. If you are pregnant, they can give you your estimated due date. Once you are 8-10 weeks (depending on clinic protocol) you will be released to your OB and you will be under their care for the remainder of the pregnancy.

Congrats! You are such an selfless woman, and becoming a surrogate is such an amazing opportunity.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.